An only child is accustomed to having their parents at the home for support. When the adults decide to divorce, the support system is disrupted in a way that can have a negative impact on the child. Unlike kids who have siblings, only children don’t have anyone else their age in the home who can walk the divorce journey with them. This makes it a more difficult transition for them.

One of the challenges that comes with a single child during a divorce is that they are more likely going to feel like their world is shattering. This can cause problems in their social life and at school. Their grades might suffer, but it might be hard for the teachers and parents to see the full scope of the problems that are occurring with the child.

As an only child, the coping process of learning to live between two homes can be especially difficult because they might feel as though they don’t need to put any more pressure on either parent. This can increase the feeling of loneliness that they are dealing with.

You can help your child to cope with the divorce by keeping a steady routine that is familiar. Speak to the child and let them know that you are here to listen when they need. Make it clear that they aren’t a burden to you. Ensure that your child knows that they can still have a meaningful relationship with both of their parents.

It might help to get a parenting plan worked out as quickly as possible so that you can draw on the stability that provides. Be sure to have it as detailed or flexible as necessary.